New England Secondary School Consortium

2018 School Redesign in Action Conference

Our conference team is currently finalizing the conference session descriptions. We will post all session information here by December 15th.

In the meantime, please review the pre-conference sessions that we have available. 

Pre-Conference Sessions

Embedding Social and Emotional Learning in High School Classrooms

Engaging Schools, MA

Students thrive in high school classrooms that embrace developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive teaching, and foster a relational approach to learning. Creating this environment by design requires intention and planning. How can teachers intentionally create content that simultaneously challenges students and integrates academic, social, and emotional learning? What are the features of a classroom where teachers actively partner with students to engage in respectful interactions, while holding high standards and expectations for every learner?

Participants will engage in real-time experiences to create classrooms where students feel affirmed, where their voices are heard and honored, and where their developmental and cultural needs are met. Together we will explore practical approaches to embed social and emotional learning competencies that foster students’ capacity to be self-directed, independent learners.

Participants will explore how teachers can intentionally create content that is challenging and seamlessly integrates social and emotional learning with academic learning. They will learn what it takes to design classroom experiences where teachers actively partner with students to engage in respectful interactions, while teaching rigorous content with high standards and expectations.

Session
Monday, March 12, 8:30 - 11:00 AM
Presenters

Denise Wolk (Director of Publications + Marketing)

Contact

What Happens When You Don’t Give Grades?

Francis W. Parker Charter Essential School, MA

Students at the F.W. Parker Charter Essential School have to meet standards and provide evidence of what they know and can do, but they never get a traditional letter grade at the end of a course. In such a system, how do students know how well they are doing? How do teachers track student performance and gauge readiness? What impact does learning in this system have on students?

In this session, participants will begin by examining non-graded daily assignments, then review unit-based assessments, and ultimately unpack a narrative transcript. They will have opportunities to talk about actionable feedback and to think about ways to implement standards-based assessment in their classroom or school.

Presenters will work to explicitly help participants understand proficiency-based assessment from the classroom-level through the systems-level, so that they leave with a deeper understanding of how the small parts compose the whole when it comes to non-graded work.Participants will be shown examples of narrative feedback on nightly assignments, longer term projects,narrative progress reports, and final transcripts, and will be encouraged to think about how they could implement this practice in their classroom or school.

Session
Monday, March 12, 8:30 - 11:00 AM
Presenters

Laura Warner (teacher leader/wellness teacher)

Contact

Explore Your Data!

Great Schools Partnership, ME

Many of us want to use data better. But it can be difficult to know where to start.

Data analysis hinges on asking good questions about data. In this hands-on session, participants will explore data about high school graduation rates to practice asking different types of analytical questions. Participants will work with NESSC regional and state data, as well as their own school data, to examine how our understanding of the data shifts as we look across multiple data sources.

Participants will also learn fundamental principles for creating effective data displays, and will have an opportunity to apply these techniques to their own data story. They will leave the session with new insights about how to examine data in context as well as tools to apply in exploring key questions back at school.

This session is designed for teams of 2-5 people.

Participants will:
Compare their school’s graduation data with state and New England figures collected through the NESSC’s Common Data Project;
Explore three types of questions you should ask when analyzing data;
Learn fundamental principles for creating effective data displays; and
Work in guided small groups to create a data story display.

Session
Monday, March 12, 8:30 - 11:00 AM
Presenters

Lauren Leigh Hinthorne (Director of Research and Evaluation)

Contact

The Proficiency-Based Learning Journey Simplified

Great Schools Partnership, ME

Proficiency-based teaching and learning systems are designed to help students take charge of their learning by asking these three questions: Where do I want to be? Where am I now? How can I close the gap?  In this interactive workshop, participants will hear about the fundamental components of an effective proficiency-based teaching and learning system and learn about an array of resources to support them along their journey.  Participants will also begin to develop a plan that addresses policies, practices, and community-engagement activities that will lead to the successful implementation of proficiency-based learning.

Session
Monday, March 12, 8:30 - 11:00 AM

A New Way of Building Partnerships with Families

The Right Question Institute, MA

When parents and family members have the opportunity to develop key skills to support their children’s education, monitor progress, and advocate for them when necessary, they can partner more effectively with schools to ensure student success. The Right Question Institute’s evidence-based school-family partnership builds parents’ skills of asking better questions, participating in decisions, and playing three key roles in their child’s education. Using this strategy, parents learn to ask their own questions about their children’s education, and educators learn how to build parents’ skills for more effective participation by using a set of simple methods.

Session participants will experience the school-family partnership strategy, will explore the art and science behind the methods, and will practice integrating them into their work. This session will prepare participants to use this strategy, which has been applied to a variety of setting producing consistent results, at their schools and share it with colleagues.

In this session, participants will: 1) experience the Right Question Institute’s school-family partnership strategy 2) explore examples of implementation of the strategy; 3) acquire resources and materials.

Session
Monday, March 12, 8:30 -11:00 AM
Presenters

Luz Santana (co-director) 

Contact

Luz Santana, luz@rightquestion.org

Return to top